Brazil Flag


The current flag of Brazil is green with a large yellow diamond, with a blue celestial globe and Brazil’s motto — Ordem e Progresso (Order and Progress) – in the middle. The globe includes 27 white five-pointed stars , one for each Federal District.

The flag was adopted on November 19, 1889 but it had only 21 stars at that time. The number of stars changes each time a new state is created. The current version, with the 27 stars, has been used since May 11, 1992.

The stars on the flag reflect the sky over Rio de Janeiro on November 15, 1889, the day when the Republic of Brazil was declared.

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It was believe that the colors represented the natural richness of the country. The green represented the Amazon forests and the Atlantic jungle, while the yellow represented the country’s gold reserves.

History of the flag

The Portuguese territories in the Americas (roughly today’s Brazil) never had their own flag because the tradition was to use the flag of the Kingdom of Portugal in all territories under the Portuguese Crown. In 1692, a flag with a white field and a golden armillary sphere was used by the Portuguese but later was extensively used only in Brazil , even on coins and became the unofficial ensign on Brazil.

In 1815, Brazil was elevated to the rank of kingdom and the flag used was a gold armillary sphere on a blue field. In 1822, Brazil became an empire and the flag featured the imperial coat of arms on a yellow rhombus, on a green field.

After the proclamation of the republic of Brazil in 1889, a new flag was created, inspired by the flag of the United States.

Other flags

The naval jack is a rectangular flag, featuring 21 white stars on a dark blue field. The president and vice president also have their own flags ; the presidential flag is a rectangular green with the national coat of arms in the middle, while the vice presidential standard is a yellow field with 23 blue stars disposed in a cross and the coat of arms in the middle of the upper left quadrant.

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