Vietnam Flag


Vietnam Flag is known as the “red flag with yellow star”, which literally describes how it looks. The flag was designed in 1940 and used during the uprising against the French rule during that year.

In 1941 a communist led organization was created to oppose the Japanese occupation. When Word World II ended, Ho Chi Minh, a communist leader, proclaimed Vietnam independent and the flag was used as the flag of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam since 1945. The flag was modified in 1955 (to make the edges of the stars sharper).

Until Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City) was captured in 1975, South Vietnam used a yellow flag with three red stripes. But when the Socialist Republic of Vietnam was formed in 1976, the red flag of North Vietnam became the flag of the united country.

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Symbolism

The red symbolizes the blood spilled during the war for independence. The five-pointed yellow star represents the union of peasants, soldiers, intellectuals and workers, working together to build socialism.

The Ancient and Heraldic traditions attribute other symbols to the colors; yellow stands for generosity, while red stands for bravery, honor and strength.

Historical flags

A yellow banner with a red circle in the center was adopted by Emperor Gia Long as a standard and became the first national flag of Vietnam in 1885. In 1890, Emperor Thành Thái adopted a flag which has a yellow background and three red stripes.

The French flew the French national flag. Only a province in the South was under French authority, while the North and Center were protectorates and flew various flags. When the Japanese occupied Vietnam, a new flag – a red trigram on a yellow background — was adopted. The French returned in 1945.

Later, as Cochinchina province became the Provisional Central Government of Vietnam, a new flag was adopted. It was the yellow flag with three red stripes, used in the South until 1975. While the overseas Vietnamese still use this flag, it is banned de facto in Vietnam.

Photo credit: Alex Popescu via Facebook

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